Intellectual Property Rights

We provide IPR services that encourage individuals and businesses

Copyright

A copyright is best thought of as a group of exclusive rights. This includes the adaption of the work, the distribution of the work, and the copying of the work.

Patents Certificate

A patent is defined as a group of exclusive rights that a national government can give to either an inventor or their assignee for a specific period of time

Trademarks

A trademarks can be a process, practice, design, formula, pattern, or a collection of information that is not commonly known or plausibly attainable

Protect your business

Intellectual property (IP) is a legal perception which refers to creations of the intellect for which special rights are recognized. In intellectual property law, title-holders are awarded certain restricted rights to a range of intangible talents, such as musical, literary, and artistic works; discoveries and inventions; and symbols, phrases, words, and architectural designs. Ordinary types of intellectual property rights comprise copyright, trademarks, patents, industrial design rights, trade dress, and in a little jurisdictions business secrets.

Intellectual property (IP) contributes enormously to our national and state economies. Dozens of industries across our economy rely on the adequate enforcement of their patents, trademarks, and copyrights, while consumers use IP to ensure they are purchasing safe, guaranteed products. We believe IP rights are worth protecting, both domestically and abroad.

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Copyright

patent

Patents

Trademark

Trademarks

Advantages and Disadvantages of Intellectual Property Rights

The concept of intellectual property is not an entirely new one, but it has become increasingly more important as the economy worldwide has begun to shift into what is known as an information economy. This shift has started to change what is considered valuable in private exchange. Instead of physical objects, or land, the most important form of property in this new world is intellectual, the creative products of the human mind. 

01

Trade Mark

A sign that can distinguish the goods and services from one trader from those of another. Might include words, logos, pictures or a combination of these

Advantage:

Legally prevents others taking advantage of customer good will generated by your business by trading under your name (or something very similar)

Disadvantages:

Having a registered trade mark does not entitle you to the related internet domain names The degree to which similar (not identical) trademarks infringe upon your business is a matter for debate in civil action with related cost.

02

Copyrights

Comes into effect immediately something that can be protected is created and ‘fixed’ in some way e.g. on paper, on film, via sound recording, as an electronic record on the internet, etc.

Advantage:

No official registration required. Comes into effect immediately. No cost to marking something as copyright

Disadvantages:

Does not protect ideas, only the way in which the idea is expressed to be effective it must be enforced. You have responsibility for legally asserting copyright if you feel it is infringed. Involves legal costs and proving infringement.

03

Patent

Granted by a government, a patent is the right for a limited period to stop others making, using or selling an invention without permission. Patents are concerned with products or process which are:

New, cannot have been made public in anyway before the date the patent is filed Involve an inventive step be capable of industrial application, as distinct from a purely intellectual or aesthetic activity. Process alleged to operate in a manner contrary to well-established physical laws therefore do not have industrial application Patents can be taken on a country specific basis or worldwide. More countries means more cost and effort to achieve this.

Advantage:

A patent gives the legal right to stop others using your invention. Its existence may be enough to deter competitors Buys time (20 years) in which an inventor can develop a market to the product or process Attractive to investors as it limits competition.

Disadvantages:

Takes time and money to establish a patent. All patents have to be 'researched' to ensure there are no existing patents of a similar nature – involves legal fees Not possible to guarantee that a patent (once granted) is valid, it can be legally challenged and revoked with no refunds It is still up to the inventor to protect a patent if they can identify an infringement – the patent office don't take sides Granting a patent is no indication that the invention has any merit or commercial value some products and process can be varied slightly to get around the exact wording of Patents.

04

Industrial Design

Granted by a government, a patent is the right for a limited period to stop others making, using or selling an invention without permission. Patents are concerned with products or process which are:

New, cannot have been made public in anyway before the date the patent is filed Involve an inventive step be capable of industrial application, as distinct from a purely intellectual or aesthetic activity. Process alleged to operate in a manner contrary to well-established physical laws therefore do not have industrial application Patents can be taken on a country specific basis or worldwide. More countries means more cost and effort to achieve this.

Advantage:

Can be combined with legal protection from copy right and design rights Protect genuine design innovation for up to 25 year.

Disadvantages:

Cannot be applied to designs that concern how a product works or which are not visible in normal use – ascetics only Easily subverted by slight amendments to the basic design

It could be a snap, logo, blog post, music or song, an intact website as a zip or just about any type of digital file that you can upload or is part of an RSS Feed.

A unique work is anything that you create that is not a copy of rather else and that has been summary to material form (i.e. it’s not just an idea).

FAQS

Most frequent questions and answers

Intellectual property is intangible property such as ideas, expressions, formulas, or any other creation of the mind. Intellectual property, like tangible real or personal property, may be bought, sold, or leased. The major types of intellectual property include patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets.

A copyright protects the “original works” of an author against copying, performance, display, or use as a underlying work. It protects the form of expression rather than the subject matter or idea. Materials within the copyright protection include books, articles, musical and artistic works, computer software, and class notes. For details, see the US Copyright Office’s Frequently Asked Questions about Copyright.

Copyright is a form of protection provided to the authors of “original works of authorship” including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works, both published and unpublished. The copyright protects the form of expression rather than the subject matter of the expression. A person could convey the same subject matter of the copyrighted work in a different form of expression without infringing the copyright. For example, copyrighted software protects the actual code, but a patented code would protect the function of the software, preventing others from developing their own similar code.

A patent is a right to exclude others from making, selling, or using the patented invention for a limited term (20 years after June 8, 1995). A patent is essentially a legally recognized monopoly that the government grants in exchange for a disclosure of how to make and use an invention there are three different types of patents: design patents, plant patents, and utility patents. Design patents protect non-functional, novel design for an article of manufacture. Plant patents protect new and distinct asexually reproducible plant varieties. Utility patents are the most common form of patent protection. Utility patents protect any new, useful process, machine, manufacture or composition of matter or any new or useful improvement thereof.

A patent is obtained by applying with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The application is examined to determine whether the invention meets the requirements of usefulness, novelty and no obviousness. The application must provide an enabling description of the invention so that one skilled in the relevant art could practice the invention. The “best mode” of practicing the invention must also be disclosed.

Patent law specifies that a patent can be obtained for any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvements thereof. To be patentable, inventions must satisfy three criteria: utility, novelty, and non-obviousness.

Utility requires that the invention have some beneficial use. If the invention is a machine, it must work. If the invention is a chemical, it must have a specific use. An invention has novelty if it is new. In other words, novelty is lost if the invention has been known or used by others in the Pakistan or patented or published by others anywhere in the world before the date of the invention. A new use of an old invention can be novel.

Lastly, an invention must not be “obvious” to “one of ordinary skill in the art.” Since these are subjective terms, there is frequent disagreement about the fulfillment of this requirement, particularly between the patent applicant (typically through a patent attorney) and the Patent and Trademark Office. This criterion must be assessed on a case-by-case basis and expert legal opinion is essential.

Copyright, a form of intellectual property law, protects original works of authorship including literary, dramatic, musical, and artistic works, such as poetry, novels, movies, songs, computer software, and architecture. Copyright does not protect facts, ideas, systems, or methods of operation, although it may protect the way these things are expressed.

Your work is under copyright protection the moment it is created and fixed in a real form that it is perceptible either directly or with the aid of an appliance or device.

The original authorship appearing on a website may be protected by copyright. This includes writings, artwork, photographs, and other forms of authorship protected by copyright.

Copyright law does not protect domain names. The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), a nonprofit organization that has assumed the responsibility for domain name system management, administers the assignation of domain names through accredited registers.

A mere listing of ingredients is not protected under copyright law. However, where a recipe or formula is accompanied by substantial literary expression in the form of an explanation or directions, or when there is a collection of recipes as in a cookbook, there may be a basis for copyright protection. Note that if you have secret ingredients to a recipe that you do not wish to be revealed, you should not submit your recipe for registration, because applications and deposit copies are public records.

No. Names are not protected by copyright law. Some names may be protected under trademark law.

Copyright does not protect names, titles, slogans, or short phrases. In some cases, these things may be protected as trademarks. Contact the safehiring Office, for further information. However, copyright protection may be available for logo artwork that contains sufficient authorship. In some circumstances, an artistic logo may also be protected as a trademark.

Publication is not necessary for copyright protection.

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